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Metals and Non-Metals

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NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3

The chapter Metals and Non Metals delves deep into the world of elements, specifically focusing on the contrasting properties of metals and non-metals. 

Physical Properties:

  • Metals: They are the “stars” of the show when it comes to shine. Their lustrous and glistening appearance makes them readily identifiable. They are like modeling clay in the hands of a sculptor – highly malleable, allowing them to be hammered into thin sheets without breaking. Similarly, their ductility allows them to be stretched into thin wires. Metals are the superheroes of conduction, efficiently transferring both heat and electricity throughout their body. They boast high melting and boiling points (except for mercury, the liquid metal exception). Additionally, when struck, they produce a clear, ringing sound, making them sonorous.
  • Non-metals: Unlike metals, non-metals don’t have a uniform appearance. They can be dull or have a variety of finishes. They lack the flexibility of metals and are generally brittle, meaning they tend to break easily under pressure. They’re not fans of sharing the spotlight when it comes to conduction – they are poor conductors of heat and electricity (with the exception of graphite, which conducts electricity due to its unique structure). Their melting and boiling points vary widely across the non-metal spectrum. Unlike the melodious ring of metals, non-metals are generally non-sonorous.

Chemical Properties:

  • Metals: These are the party animals of the element world, generally quite reactive. However, there are some exceptions, like the noble metals (gold, platinum) who prefer to stay exclusive. Metals tend to lose electrons easily during chemical reactions, undergoing oxidation. This electron loss leads to the formation of positively charged ions (cations) and often results in the formation of ionic compounds. They readily react with oxygen in the environment, forming oxides. This oxidation can lead to phenomena like rusting or tarnishing. Metals can also be feisty competitors – they can displace less reactive metals from their compounds in a process called displacement reaction.
  • Non-metals: The world of non-metals is more diverse when it comes to reactivity. Some, like halogens, are highly reactive, while others, like noble gases, are quite inert. They can be flexible players, capable of both gaining or losing electrons during reactions (oxidation or reduction). This electron exchange allows them to form ionic compounds as well. The oxides formed by non-metals can have varying properties – some are acidic (e.g., sulfur trioxide), while others are basic (e.g., calcium oxide). Unlike metals that primarily form ionic compounds, non-metals can also form covalent compounds by sharing electrons with other elements.

Beyond the Basics:

  • Reactivity Series of Metals: This chapter introduces the concept of the reactivity series, a ranking of metals based on their tendency to displace other metals from their compounds.
  • Metal Extraction: The journey of metals from their ores to usable forms is briefly explored. Different methods like electrolysis, roasting, and reduction are introduced depending on the reactivity of the metal being extracted.
  • Alloys: The chapter dives into the world of mixtures – specifically, alloys. These are formed by combining two or more metals, resulting in a material with properties often superior to its individual components. Stainless steel is a popular example of an alloy.

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

Questions(Page 40)

1. Give an example of a metal which :

(i) is a liquid at room temperature.

(ii) can be easily cut with a knife.

(iii) is the best conductor of heat.

(iv) is a poor conductor of heat.

Ans : 

(i) Liquid at room temperature:  Mercury (Hg) is the only metal that is liquid at room temperature.

(ii) Easily cut with a knife:  Several alkali metals like Sodium (Na) and Potassium (K) are soft enough to be cut with a knife.

(iii) Best conductor of heat:  Silver (Ag) is considered the best conductor of heat among metals. However, Copper (Cu) is also a very good conductor.

(iv) Poor conductor of heat: While most metals are good conductors of heat, some are relatively poor conductors. Examples include Lead (Pb) and Mercury (Hg).

2. Explain the meanings of malleable and ductile.

Ans : 

Malleability: You can hammer it thin (like shaping clay).

Ductility: You can pull it into thin wires (like taffy).

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

Questions (Page 46)

1. Why is sodium kept immersed in kerosene oil ?

Ans : Sodium is stored submerged in kerosene oil for two main reasons:

  1. Prevents Reaction with Air and Moisture: Sodium is a highly reactive metal. When exposed to air, it reacts vigorously with oxygen, potentially catching fire. Kerosene oil acts as a barrier, preventing contact with air and moisture that would trigger this reaction.
  2. Safety:  Sodium reacts explosively with water. Keeping it submerged prevents accidental contact with water, minimizing the risk of a dangerous explosion. Kerosene oil is non-reactive with sodium and helps ensure safe handling.

2. Write equations for the reactions of

(i) iron with steam.

(ii) calcium and potassium with water.

Ans : 

(i) Iron with steam:

3Fe(s) + 4H2O(g) → Fe3O4(s) + 4H2(g)

  • Iron (Fe) reacts with steam (H2O) to form iron(II,III) oxide (Fe3O4) and hydrogen gas (H2).

(ii) Reactions of Calcium and Potassium with Water:

a) Calcium with water:

Ca(s) + 2H2O(l) → Ca(OH)2(aq) + H2(g)

  • Calcium (Ca) reacts with water (H2O) to form calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and hydrogen gas (H2).

b) Potassium with water:

2K(s) + 2H2O(l) → 2KOH(aq) + H2(g) + Heat

  • Potassium (K) reacts vigorously with water (H2O) to form potassium hydroxide (KOH) and hydrogen gas (H2). This reaction also releases a significant amount of heat.

3. Samples of four metals A, B, C and D were taken and added to the following solution one by one.

The results obtained have been tabulated as follows :

MetalIron (II) sulphateCopper (II) sulphateZinc sulphateSilver nitrate
ANo reactionDisplacement
BDisplacementNo reaction
CNo reactionNo reactionNo reactionDisplacement
DNo reactionNo reactionNo reactionNo reaction

Use the Table above to answer the following questions about metals A, B, C and D.
(i) Which is the most reactive metal ?
(ii) What would you observe if B is added to a solution of copper (II) sulphate?
(iii) Arrange the metals A, B, C and D in the order of decreasing reactivity.

Ans : Based on the observations in the table, we can determine the reactivity of metals A, B, C, and D:

(i) Most Reactive Metal: Metal B is the most reactive metal.

  • It displaces iron from iron(II) sulfate, indicating it’s more reactive than iron.
  • It doesn’t react with other solutions, suggesting it’s less reactive than copper (II), zinc, and silver (which don’t displace B).

(ii) B with Copper(II) Sulfate:

Adding metal B to copper(II) sulfate would result in a displacement reaction. Metal B, being more reactive, would displace copper from the solution. You would observe:

  • A reddish-brown copper metal deposit forming on metal B.
  • The blue color of copper(II) sulfate solution fading.

(iii) Order of Decreasing Reactivity:

Based on the observations:

  1. B (displaces iron)
  2. A (displaces copper)
  3. C (displaces silver)
  4. D (no reaction with any solution)

Therefore, the order of decreasing reactivity is:  B > A > C > D

4. Which gas is produced when dilute hydrochloric acid is added to a reactive metal ? Write the chemical reaction when iron reacts with dilute H2SO4.

Ans : When dilute hydrochloric acid (HCl) is added to a reactive metal, the gas produced is hydrogen gas (H2).

Here’s the general reaction for a reactive metal (M) reacting with HCl:

M (s) + 2HCl (aq) → MCl2 (aq) + H2 (g)

  • M: Represents the reactive metal.
  • MCl2: Represents the metal chloride salt formed.

Iron with Dilute Sulfuric Acid:

The chemical reaction when iron (Fe) reacts with dilute sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is:

Fe (s) + H2SO4 (aq) → FeSO4 (aq) + H2 (g)

  • FeSO4: Iron(II) sulfate is the salt formed in this reaction.

5. What would you observe when zinc is added to a solution of iron (II) sulphate ? Write the chemical reaction that takes place.

Ans : When zinc (Zn) is added to a solution of iron(II) sulfate (FeSO4), you would observe the following:

Observation:

  • A grey precipitate of iron (Fe) metal forms.
  • The initially green or pale green color of the iron(II) sulfate solution may fade or become lighter.

Chemical Reaction:

The reaction is a displacement reaction. Zinc, being more reactive than iron, displaces iron from its sulfate salt solution. The balanced chemical equation is:

Zn (s) + FeSO4 (aq) → ZnSO4 (aq) + Fe (s)

  • Zn: Zinc metal (reactant)
  • FeSO4: Iron(II) sulfate solution (reactant)
  • ZnSO4: Zinc sulfate solution (product)
  • Fe: Iron metal precipitate (product)

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

Questions (Page 49)

1. (i) Write the electron dot structures for sodium, oxygen and magnesium.

Ans : Here are the electron dot structures for sodium (Na), oxygen (O), and magnesium (Mg):

  • Sodium (Na):
    • Has 1 valence electron (outermost electron shell)
    • Electron dot structure: Na ·
  • Oxygen (O):
    • Has 6 valence electrons
    • Electron dot structure: :O:
  • Magnesium (Mg):
    • Has 2 valence electrons
    • Electron dot structure: Mg ···

(ii) Show the formation of Na2O and MgO by the transfer of electrons.

Electron Transfer: Metal Oxides

Na to Na2O:

  • Na loses 1 electron (Na* -> Na⁺).
  • Oxygen gains 2 electrons (:O: -> O²⁻).
  • 2 Na⁺ and 1 O²⁻ combine (ionic attraction) to form Na2O.

Mg to MgO:

  • Mg loses both electrons (Mg -> Mg²⁺).
  • Oxygen gains 2 electrons (:O: -> O²⁻).
  • Mg²⁺ and O²⁻ combine (ionic attraction) to form MgO.

(iii) What are ions present in these compounds?

Ans : Based on the information we discussed previously:

1. Sodium Oxide (Na2O):

  • Ions present: Na⁺ (Sodium ion) and O²⁻ (Oxide ion)

2. Magnesium Oxide (MgO):

  • Ions present: Mg²⁺ (Magnesium ion) and O²⁻ (Oxide ion)

2. Why do ionic compounds have high melting points ?

Ans : Ionic compounds like strong magnets! Positive and negative ions tightly attract, needing high heat (energy) to break free – that’s why they melt at high temperatures.

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

Questions (Page 53)

Define the following terms : (i) Mineral, (ii) Ore and (iii) Gangue

Ans : 

i) Mineral:

  • A naturally occurring, inorganic, solid substance with a definite chemical composition and an ordered atomic arrangement.
  • Minerals can be elements (e.g., gold) or compounds (e.g., quartz).
  • They are the building blocks of rocks.

ii) Ore:

  • A mineral deposit from which a metal can be extracted profitably.
  • Not all minerals are ores. Only those that can be economically extracted to obtain a metal are considered ores.
  • The metal in an ore is usually found in a combined state with other elements.

iii) Gangue:

  • The unwanted material in an ore that surrounds the desired mineral.
  • It is often a mixture of other minerals and can be sand, rock, or other impurities.
  • Gangue needs to be removed from the ore during the extraction process to obtain the desired metal.

2. Name two metals which are found in nature in the free state.

Ans : Two metals commonly found in nature in their free state (elemental form) are:

  1. Gold (Au): Due to its low reactivity, gold often occurs as nuggets or flakes in rocks and alluvial deposits.
  2. Silver (Ag): Similar to gold, silver’s low reactivity allows it to be found in its native state, although less commonly than gold.

3. What chemical process is used for obtaining a metal from its oxide.

Ans : The chemical process used for obtaining a metal from its oxide is called reduction.

During reduction, the oxide undergoes a reaction where it loses oxygen. Since oxygen is gaining electrons when it is removed from the oxide, reduction is also considered the process where an element gains electrons.

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

Questions (Page 55)

1. Metallic oxides of zinc, magnesium and copper were heated with the following metals :

MetalZincMagnesiumCopper
1.Zinc oxide
2.Magnesium oxide
3.Copper oxide

In which cases will you find displacement reactions taking place ?

Ans : 

ZincMagnesiumCopperMetal
1.Zinc oxideDisplacement
2.Magnesium oxide
3.Copper oxideDisplacementDisplacement

2. Which metals do not corrode easily ?

Ans : 

  • Gold (Au): Gold is one of the most unreactive metals. It’s known for its resistance to tarnishing and corrosion, making it a valuable material for jewelry and other applications.
  • Platinum (Pt): Similar to gold, platinum is highly resistant to corrosion and tarnishing. It’s used in jewelry, catalysts, and other applications where a durable and non-reactive metal is needed.

3. What are alloys ?

Ans : Alloys are like mixing metals to make super metals! Combining different elements creates a new material with improved strength, hardness, or other cool properties that the original metals didn’t have on their own.  Think steel (iron + carbon) or brass (copper + zinc).

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

Exercises

1. Which of the following pairs will give displacement reactions ?

(a) NaCl solution and copper metal.

(b) MgCl2 solution and aluminium metal.

(c) FeSO4 solution and silver metal.

(d) AgNO3 solution and copper metal.

Ans : (d) AgNO3 solution and copper metal.

2. Which of the following methods is suitable for preventing an iron frying pan from rusting ?

(a) Applying grease

(b) Applying paint.

(c) Applying a coating of zinc

(d) All the above.

Ans : (c) Applying a coating of zinc.

3. An element reacts with oxygen to give a compound with a high melting point. This compound is also soluble in water. The element is likely to be

(a) calcium

(b) carbon

(c) silicon

(d) iron

Ans : (a) calcium

4. Food cans are coated with tin and not with zinc because

(a) zinc is costlier than tin

(b) zinc has a higher melting point than tin

(c) zinc is less reactive than tin

(d) zinc is more reactive than tin.

Ans : (d) Zinc is more reactive than tin.

5. You are given a hammer, a battery, a bulb, wires and a switch.

(a) How could you use them to distinguish between samples of metals and non-metals?

(b) Assess the usefulness of these tests in distinguishing between metals and non-metals.

Ans : 

(a) How to Use the Tools:

  1. Malleability Test (Hammer):
    • Strike a sample with the hammer.
      • If the sample flattens and can be shaped without breaking, it’s likely a metal (malleable).
      • If the sample shatters or crumbles, it’s likely a non-metal (brittle).
  2. Conductivity Test (Battery, Bulb, Wires, Switch):
    • Set up a simple circuit with the battery, bulb, wires, and switch.
    • Touch the exposed ends of the wires to the sample.
      • If the bulb lights up, the sample is likely a metal (good conductor of electricity).
      • If the bulb remains off, the sample is likely a non-metal (poor conductor of electricity).

(b) Usefulness of the Tests:

These tests are a quick and easy way to differentiate between most metals and non-metals. However, there are some limitations:

  • Malleability Test: While most metals are malleable, some like sodium can be brittle. Conversely, some non-metals like graphite can be slightly malleable.
  • Conductivity Test: While most metals are good conductors, some like mercury are poor conductors. Conversely, some non-metals like graphite can conduct electricity.

6. What are amphoteric oxides ? Give two examples of amphoteric oxides ?

Ans : Amphoteric oxides are a special class of metal oxides that exhibit characteristics of both acidic and basic oxides. This means they can react with both acids and bases to form salts and water.

Examples of Amphoteric Oxides:

  1. Aluminum Oxide (Al2O3): This is a common example.
    • Reaction with Acid: Al2O3 (s) + 6HCl (aq) → 2AlCl3 (aq) + 3H2O (l) (acts as a base)
    • Reaction with Base: Al2O3 (s) + 2NaOH (aq) + 3H2O (l) → 2NaAlO2 (aq) + 6H2O (l) (acts as an acid)
  2. Zinc Oxide (ZnO): Another common example.
    • Reaction with Acid: ZnO (s) + 2HCl (aq) → ZnCl2 (aq) + H2O (l) (acts as a base)
    • Reaction with Base: ZnO (s) + 2NaOH (aq) + H2O (l) → Na2ZnO2 (aq) + 2H2O (l) (acts as an acid)

7. Name two metals which will displace hydrogen from dilute acids and two metals which will not.

Ans : 

Metals Displacing Hydrogen from Dilute Acids:

Two metals that will displace hydrogen from dilute acids are:

  1. Magnesium (Mg): Magnesium is a relatively reactive metal. When it reacts with a dilute acid like hydrochloric acid (HCl), it displaces hydrogen gas and forms a magnesium salt:

Mg (s) + 2HCl (aq) → MgCl2 (aq) + H2 (g)

  1. Zinc (Zn): Similar to magnesium, zinc is also reactive enough to displace hydrogen from dilute acids:

Zn (s) + 2HCl (aq) → ZnCl2 (aq) + H2 (g)

Metals Not Displacing Hydrogen from Dilute Acids:

Two metals that will not displace hydrogen from dilute acids are:

  1. Copper (Cu): Copper is less reactive than hydrogen. When placed in dilute acid, it won’t react and displace hydrogen:

Cu (s) + HCl (aq) → No Reaction

  1. Silver (Ag): Similar to copper, silver is also less reactive than hydrogen and won’t displace it from dilute acids:

Ag (s) + HCl (aq) → No Reaction

8. In the electrolytic refining of a metal M, what would you take as the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte ?

Ans :In the electrolytic refining of a metal M:

  • Anode: A rod or plate of the impure metal M itself is used as the anode.
  • Cathode: A thin strip of pure metal M is used as the cathode.
  • Electrolyte: An aqueous solution of a metal M salt is used as the electrolyte.

9. Pratyush took sulphur powder on a spatula and heated it. He collected the gas evolved by inverting a test tube over it, as shown in the figure.

(a) What will be the action of gas on

(i) dry litmus paper ?

(ii) moist litmus paper ?

(b) Write a balanced chemical equation for the reaction taking place.

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3 Metals and Non-metals Chapter End Questions Q9

Ans : 

(a) Action of the Gas on Litmus Paper:

(i) Dry Litmus Paper:  There will be no change in color of dry litmus paper. Sulphur dioxide gas (SO2) requires moisture to react and turn litmus paper acidic.

(ii) Moist Litmus Paper:  Moist litmus paper will turn red. Sulphur dioxide gas (SO2) dissolves in moisture to form sulfurous acid (H2SO3), which is a weak acid that turns moist blue litmus paper red.

(b) Balanced Chemical Equation:

The balanced chemical equation for the reaction taking place when sulphur powder is heated is:

S(s) + O2(g) → SO2(g)

11. What type of oxides are formed when non-metals combine with oxygen ?

Ans : 

  1. Acidic Oxides: These oxides react with water to form acidic solutions. Some common examples include:
    • Carbon dioxide (CO2): CO2 dissolves in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3):
      • CO2 (g) + H2O (l) → H2CO3 (aq)
    • Sulphur dioxide (SO2): SO2 dissolves in water to form sulfurous acid (H2SO3):
      • SO2 (g) + H2O (l) → H2SO3 (aq)
    • Nitrogen dioxide (NO2): NO2 reacts with water to form nitric acid (HNO2) and nitrous acid (HNO3):
      • 2NO2 (g) + H2O (l) → HNO2 (aq) + HNO3 (aq)
  2. Neutral Oxides: These oxides do not react with water to produce acidic or basic solutions. Some examples include:
    • Carbon monoxide (CO): CO does not react with water.
    • Nitric oxide (NO): NO does not react with water.

12. Give reasons :

(a) Platinum, gold and silver are used to make jewellery.

(b) Sodium, potassium and lithium are stored under oil.

(c) Aluminium is a highly reactive metal, yet it is used to make utensils for cooking.

(d) Carbonate and sulphide ores are usually converted into oxides during the process of extraction.

Ans : 

(a) Platinum, gold and silver are used to make jewellery:

  • Lustrous and Beautiful: These metals have a naturally shiny and attractive appearance that polishes well.
  • Corrosion Resistant: They are highly resistant to tarnishing and corrosion, meaning they maintain their shine over time.
  • Malleable and Ductile: These metals are easily shaped and worked with without breaking, allowing for intricate jewelry designs.

(b) Sodium, potassium and lithium are stored under oil:

  • Highly Reactive: These alkali metals are very reactive with air and moisture.
  • Violent Reaction with Water: Exposure to air or water can cause a violent reaction, igniting the metal and producing hazardous fumes.
  • Oil Exclusion: Oil forms a protective layer, preventing contact with air and moisture, and keeping the metals safe.

(c) Aluminium is a highly reactive metal, yet it is used to make utensils for cooking:

  • Forms a Protective Layer: Aluminium readily forms a thin layer of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on its surface when exposed to air.
  • Inert Oxide Layer: This aluminum oxide layer is highly stable and unreactive. It acts as a barrier, preventing further reaction with food or water during cooking.
  • Lightweight and Conducts Heat: Aluminium is lightweight and conducts heat well, making it a practical choice for cookware.

(d) Carbonate and sulphide ores are usually converted into oxides during the extraction process:

  • Easier Reduction: Metal oxides are generally easier to reduce to the pure metal than carbonates or sulfides. Reduction involves removing oxygen from the metal compound.
  • Reduction Methods: Many common extraction methods like heating with carbon (carbon reduction) work more efficiently with oxides.
  • Conversion Process: Carbonates and sulfides can be converted to oxides through roasting (heating in air) to remove carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide gas.

13. You must have seen tarnished copper vessels being cleaned with lemon or tamarind juice. Explain why these sour subsunsuspecting lady gave a set of gold bangles to him which he dipped in a particular solution. The bangles sparkled like new but their weight was reduced drastically. The lady was upset but after a futile argument the man beat a hasty repeat. Can you play the detective to find out the nature of the solution he has used ?

Ans : The dishonest goldsmith likely ustances are effective in cleaning the vessels.

Ans : Tarnished copper gets coated with a greenish layer (copper carbonate) from reacting with air. Lemon or tamarind juice are acidic! This weak acid dissolves the copper carbonate layer, exposing the shiny copper underneath.  Think of it like a weak acid gently removing the tarnish layer to reveal the bright copper.

14. Differentiate between metal and non-metal on the basis of their chemical properties. 

Ans : 

PropertyMetalsNon-metals
Reactivity with OxygenForm mostly ionic oxides (basic or amphoteric)Form oxides with varying properties (acidic, neutral, or covalent)
Displacement ReactionsCan displace less reactive metals from their salt solutionsDon’t participate in displacement reactions
Reaction with Dilute AcidsMost react to form hydrogen gas (H₂) and a metal saltGenerally don’t react

15. A man went door-to door posing as a goldsmith. He promised to bring back the glitter of old and dull gold ornaments. An ed a solution containing aqua regia

Weight Reduction: Aqua regia is a highly corrosive mixture of concentrated nitric acid (HNO₃) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). It dissolves gold, which explains the weight reduction in the bangles.

  • Sparkling Appearance: Dissolving a small amount of gold from the surface can remove tarnish and imperfections, creating a temporary shine.

Other possibilities are less likely:

  • Harmless Polishing Agents: These wouldn’t cause a significant weight reduction.
  • Weak Acids: While weak acids might clean tarnish, they wouldn’t dissolve gold and wouldn’t explain the weight loss.

The key points are:

  • Weight Loss: Aqua regia dissolves gold, explaining the missing weight.
  • Temporary Shine: Dissolving some gold can create a temporary sparkle.

Therefore, aqua regia is the most likely solution used by the fake goldsmith.

16. Give reasons why copper is used to make hot water tanks and not steel (analloy of iron).

Ans : There are two main reasons why copper is preferred over steel (an alloy of iron) for hot water tanks:

  1. Corrosion Resistance:
    • Steel: Iron, the main component of steel, readily reacts with oxygen and water to form rust (iron oxide). This rust weakens the tank and reduces its lifespan. Hot water can accelerate this corrosion process.
    • Copper: Copper is less reactive than iron. While it can form a green patina over time, this layer is relatively stable and doesn’t significantly weaken the tank or contaminate the water.
  2. Heat Conductivity:
    • Copper: Copper is an excellent conductor of heat. This allows hot water tanks made of copper to heat water efficiently and distribute heat evenly throughout the tank.
    • Steel: Steel is a poorer conductor of heat compared to copper. This means it takes longer to heat water in a steel tank, and there may be hot and cold spots within the tank.

NCERT Solutions for class 10 Science Chapter 3 : Metals and Non Metals

FAQs

What topics are covered in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3 cover the properties, reactions, and uses of metals and non-metals. It includes topics like physical and chemical properties, reactivity series, extraction of metals, and the uses of metals and non-metals in daily life.

How do metals and non-metals differ in their physical properties according to Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

According to Class 10 Science Chapter 3, metals are generally shiny, malleable, ductile, and good conductors of heat and electricity, while non-metals are usually dull, brittle, and poor conductors of heat and electricity.

What is the reactivity series as per NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

The reactivity series, as per NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3, is a list of metals arranged in order of decreasing reactivity. Highly reactive metals like potassium and sodium are at the top, while less reactive metals like gold and platinum are at the bottom.

How are metals extracted from their ores according to Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

Class 10 Science Chapter 3 explains that metals are extracted from their ores through various processes like mining, concentration, reduction, and refining. The method used depends on the reactivity of the metal and the nature of the ore.

What are the uses of metals and non-metals discussed in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

The uses of metals and non-metals discussed in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3 include their applications in construction, manufacturing, medicine, and technology. For example, iron is used in building structures, and silicon is used in electronics.

How do metals react with acids according to Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

According to Class 10 Science Chapter 3, metals react with acids to produce hydrogen gas and a salt. For example, zinc reacts with hydrochloric acid to form zinc chloride and hydrogen gas.

What is the importance of alloys as per NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3 highlight the importance of alloys, which are mixtures of metals with other elements. Alloys have enhanced properties like increased strength, durability, and resistance to corrosion, making them valuable in various industries.

How are non-metals used in daily life as discussed in Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

Class 10 Science Chapter 3 discusses the use of non-metals in daily life, such as carbon in the form of graphite used in pencils, sulfur used in fertilizers, and oxygen essential for respiration.

What are some examples of chemical reactions involving metals and non-metals from NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

Some examples from NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3 include the reaction of sodium with chlorine to form sodium chloride and the reaction of magnesium with oxygen to form magnesium oxide.

Where can I find the NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3?

The NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 3 can be found in the NCERT textbook for Class 10 Science or on educational websites and platforms that provide free access to these solutions.

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